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Article
September 3, 1932

PATHOLOGY AND SYMPTOMATOLOGY OF HEADACHES DUE TO SPECIFIC SENSITIZATION

Author Affiliations

OKLAHOMA CITY

From the Balyeat Hay Fever and Asthma Clinic.

JAMA. 1932;99(10):806-813. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740620016004
Abstract

Headaches due to specific sensitization with the clinical characteristics of migraine have been reported by a number of authors.1 The term "migraine," as commonly used,2 in the main refers to paroxysmal attacks of hemicrania (occasionally bilateral headache) associated with sensory and motor disturbances. These motor and sensory symptoms, as well as the crossed hemicrania, gastric and cardiac inhibition and vasomotor changes, indicate disease of the cerebral cortex.2d Thus migraine may be defined as a paroxysmal disease characterized by hemicrania (also bilateral headache) and symptomatic evidence of cortical involvement.

There are headaches due to hypersensitiveness that cannot be classified as migraine since they do not have cortical features. Eyermann3 called attention to this and suggested the term "allergic headache" instead of "allergic migraine." Some headaches have clinical phenomena that indicate their allergic nature, but many, including migraine, do not. That any symptoms are due to allergy must

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