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December 31, 1938

A CASE OF QUARTAN MALARIA FOLLOWING TRANSFUSION AND TREATED WITH SULFANILAMIDE

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Presbyterian Hospital

JAMA. 1938;111(27):2473-2475. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.72790530001009
Abstract

Transfusion of whole blood has become a commonplace in clinical therapeutics within the last two decades. As a rule, steps are taken to exclude syphilis in the donor. Little attention is ordinarily paid to other infectious diseases. A number of cases wherein diseases other than syphilis are alleged to have been transmitted to patients through the medium of transfusion have been reported. Of these malaria is the most important, especially in regions where malaria is prevalent. Since 1911, when Woolsey1 reported the first accidental transmission of malaria as the result of blood transfusion, numerous case reports have appeared, particularly from countries where malaria is not common, and transfusion seemed to be the only likely source of infection. In many cases the parasites have been identified in the blood of the donor. Wright 2 has recently made a thorough review of the subject, and has collected twenty-nine cases from the

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