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Article
September 24, 1932

THE VALUE OF SALMON OIL IN THE TREATMENT OF INFANTILE RICKETS

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the New Haven Rickets Studies of the U. S. Children's Bureau, the U. S. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils, the Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, and the Pediatric Service of New Haven Hospital and Dispensary.

JAMA. 1932;99(13):1075-1082. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740650033009
Abstract

Fish oils, notably cod liver oil, have long been known to be the best natural source of the antirachitic vitamin. For some time it has been known that salmon oil contains vitamin D,1 but until recently the oil has been considered to be of relatively slight2 or of only moderate3 vitamin D potency as compared with cod liver oil and has not been used in the treatment of infantile rickets. In 1931, Tolle and Nelson4 showed by biologic assay that salmon oil, when prepared in such a manner as to conserve its maximum vitamin A and vitamin D potency, is at least as powerful an antirachitic agent as cod liver oil and may be twice as potent. Contrary to the reports of others,5 these investigators were also able to show that the vitamin A content of oil from certain species of salmon may be as

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