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Article
September 24, 1932

LONDON

JAMA. 1932;99(13):1094-1095. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740650052021

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Abstract

Association for the Advancement of Science  The annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science was held at York. There was no meeting in the Section of Physiology, in consequence of the holding this year of the International Congress of Physiology, but many of the papers were of special interest to physicians.

PROTECTION FROM NOISE  In previous letters, the evil effects on the healthy, as well as the ill, of the greatly increased noise of our cities, principally in consequence of automobile traffic, have been mentioned. In the Engineering Section Dr. G. W. C. Kaye, superintendent of the physics department of the National Physical Laboratory, read a paper on the suppression of noise. He stated that the available processes of protection were (1) suppression of the source; (2) isolating screens or enclosures, or, alternatively, absorption; (3) arresting structure-transmitted noise by breaking the continuity in some way, or

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