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Article
May 2, 1953

Body Temperature: Its Changes with Environment, Disease and Therapy.

JAMA. 1953;152(1):101. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.03690010107037

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Abstract

This book offers a concise review of thermal phenomena in the human body. The opening chapter discusses the importance of heat regulation, its development in infancy, and the normal values under varying conditions. Subsequent chapters take up heat production, heat dissipation, the integrated action of the various regulatory mechanisms, the details of the neural mechanism, internal disturbances, and environmental disturbances. The final chapter deals with sensitivity to heat and cold. There is a bibliography of 222 references and a brief index.

The manner of presentation is clear and succinct; the subject matter is of scientific importance, and human interest is added by allusion to such instances as the Chicago "deep-freeze" woman. The details of this case, not available when this book was written, have since been published by Laufman in The Journal (147:1201-1212 [Nov. 24] 1951). The passages on rewarming frostbitten bodies (pages 80-92) do not mention the all-important

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