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April 6, 1946

ANESTHESIOLOGY IN THE HOSPITAL AND IN THE MEDICAL SCHOOL

Author Affiliations

Professor of Anesthesiology, University of Wisconsin Medical School Madison, Wis.

JAMA. 1946;130(14):909-912. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870140001001
Abstract

Two circumstances have been blamed for the delay or reluctance in accepting to the fullest the service which modern anesthesia might render. One is the lack of a sufficient number and quality of physicians prepared to accept the responsibility. The other, sometimes suggested as a cause for the first, is the existence of widespread abuses, exploitation and all round lack of appreciation of those who are devoting their energies to the specialty. The present would seem to be an auspicious time to reconsider the subject and to discuss how anesthesiology can best serve the needs of the medical student, the surgical profession, the hospital and, most important of all, our patients. During the war many surgeons for the first time observed the advantages of medical training as the foundation for an anesthetist. At the same time the number of physicians who realize the importance and attractiveness of anesthesiology as a

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