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May 16, 1953

CORTICOTROPIN (ACTH) IN TREATMENT OF AGRANULOCYTOSIS FOLLOWING SULFISOXAZOLE THERAPY

Author Affiliations

East Orange, N. J.
Dr. S. A. Goldberg, Pathologist, Presbyterian Hospital, Newark, N. J., examined the blood and bone marrow specimens in this case.

JAMA. 1953;152(3):232-234. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.63690030012006e
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to report additional evidence of the value of corticotropin (ACTH) in the treatment of agranulocytosis. Three cases have already been reported in the literature,1 and a fourth is reported here.

REPORT OF A CASE  A 72-year-old white man, a retired banker, was admitted to the Presbyterian Hospital, Newark, N. J., June 2, 1952, with a history of urinary frequency and dysuria of at least one year's duration. On February 9, 1952, he was in an automobile accident and was hospitalized for two weeks because of fractures of the left arm and five ribs. On May 2, 1952, sulfisoxazole (Gantrisin) therapy was started because of the urologic complaints. During the ensuing four weeks, the patient ingested eight tablets (0.5 gm. each) of sulfisoxazole daily for the first week, four tablets daily for the second week, and then eight tablets daily for the remainder of

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