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Article
October 8, 1932

THE SURGEON'S RESPONSIBILITY IN THE READJUSTMENT OF THE INJURED TO WORK

Author Affiliations

Director of General Surgery, Children's Hospital of Michigan; Associate Surgeon, Harper Hospital, Herman Kiefer Hospital; Associate Professor of Surgery, Detroit College of Medicine and Surgery DETROIT

JAMA. 1932;99(15):1213-1215. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740670001001
Abstract

The responsibility of the surgeon who treats the injured is greater today than it has ever been. This is due to the many advances that have been made in the medical and surgical treatment of the injured, as well as to greater competition and refinement in this work; therefore, better results are expected. To attain favorable results, it is incumbent on the surgeon to render efficient service, to carry out a systematic "follow-up" of his patients, and to use every means to return the injured to work, physically fit and in a normal state of mind.

The employer, realizing the importance of efficient medical care, accepts the expense attached thereto as an integral part of his overhead. Until recent years, he was concerned with the prevention and compensation aspects of industrial accidents. These two problems, though necessary and desirable, are not in themselves adequate methods of dealing with the problems

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