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Article
October 8, 1932

RELATIONSHIP OF THYROID DISEASE TO CHRONIC NONSPECIFIC ARTHRITIS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Cleveland Clinic.

JAMA. 1932;99(15):1239-1244. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740670027008
Abstract

No more striking contrast can be conjured up than that evidenced in the symptoms and clinical picture manifested, on the one hand, by the patient suffering from a severe type of exophthalmic goiter, and, on the other, by the patient with obvious hypothyroidism; yet both conditions are the manifestations of some functional disturbance in the thyroid gland. Between these two extremes is that infinitely larger group of persons exhibiting a slighter degree of variation from normal thyroid function. The more general recognition of the fact that chronic, nonspecific arthritis is a systemic disease more than ever directs attention to every possible factor that may play some part in the initiation of such articular changes.

At the outset, it must be stated that by far the greater number of cases of chronic nonspecific arthritis are not attributable to thyroid dysfunction. However, the observation of many patients suffering from thyroid disease of

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