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Article
June 6, 1953

BLOOD PHENOL LEVEL AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF PHENOL-CONTAINING PREPARATIONS

Author Affiliations

Albany, N. Y.
From the departments of dermatology, physiology, and pharmacology, Albany Medical College.

JAMA. 1953;152(6):506-509. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.03690060022008
Abstract

Calamine lotion, containing 1 or 2% phenol, and a preparation composed of phenol (4.75%) and camphor (10.86%) in aromatized liquid petrolatum1 (camphophenique®) have been favorites for several decades for the treatment of disorders of the skin. Both preparations have been applied extensively with only a single incident of harmful effect reported for each. This is in contrast to the local changes, such as gangrene, and systemic effects that resulted frequently from application of aqueous solutions containing similar concentrations of phenol. Recently a fatality occurred because of the indiscriminate application of large volumes of a proprietary preparation containing 2.3% phenol in corn oil (foille®). This material was applied to a dressing covering 25 or 30% of a boy's body surface for the treatment of a kerosene burn.1 The object of this investigation was to follow the level of "free" and of "conjugated" phenol of the blood after

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