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Article
June 6, 1953

AORTIC STENOSIS AND BERNHEIM'S SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

176 Hart Blvd. Staten Island, N. Y.

JAMA. 1953;152(6):551. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.03690060067028

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Abstract

To the Editor:  —In a letter to the editor (J. A. M. A. 151:1369 [April 11] 1953), Soloff and associates reject our contention that an isolated, prolonged ether time in a patient with aortic stenosis may be caused by partial occlusion of the right ventricle due to deviation of the interventricular septum (Bernheim's syndrome). Their own view, which prompted our criticism (J. A. M. A. 151:578 [Feb. 14] 1953), attributes the disproportionate increase in ether time observed in cases of aortic stenosis to secondary changes in the lungs and resultant chronic cor pulmonale (J. A. M. A. 150:1111 [Nov. 15] 1952). These authors insist that dyspnea was present early in all of their patients and that this fact, by definition, excludes Bernheim's syndrome. Their original report, nevertheless, states that 9 of the 14 patients studied had "no clinical evidence of heart failure." They also contend that they

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