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October 8, 1932

ECTOPIC PREGNANCY COMPLICATED BY RUPTURE INTO THE INTESTINE

JAMA. 1932;99(15):1253-1254. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27410670002012b
Abstract

Textbooks on gynecology and obstetrics often give the impression that the diagnosis of unruptured ectopic pregnancy is comparatively simple and that recognition of the condition after rupture or tubal abortion is made simple by the development of a train of signs and symptoms unvarying in their course and apparent at a glance to a trained observer. Unfortunately, this is not often true; and even in the hands of the masters, the diagnosis of unruptured ectopic pregnancy is more marked by the high percentage of error than by the frequency with which a correct diagnosis is made.

REPORT OF CASE  This case well illustrates the difficulty of diagnosis sometimes encountered and a complication which fortunately is rare:Aug. 15, 1930, I was consulted by a woman, aged 25, who had been married for seven years. Her complaint was vaginal bleeding. Her past history was unimportant, except for an operation one year

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