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Article
October 15, 1932

A SIMPLE TEST FOR PLASMA PROTEIN CONTENTS BELOW THE EDEMA-PRODUCING LEVEL

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Hospital of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

JAMA. 1932;99(16):1344. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27410680005010c
Abstract

A type of edema called "hydremic" has long been recognized in which the blood plasma is abnormally dilute with regard to its protein content. Such edema is encountered in nephritis, diabetes and other conditions in which malnutrition leads to plasma protein deficit. That this type of edema is due to diminished plasma protein content and to the consequent diminution of the osmotic attraction of the blood for fluid from the tissue spaces is a conclusion based on numerous physiologic experiments and clinical observations.1 Furthermore, in a study of the quantitative relationship between plasma protein deficit and the tendency to edema in nephritic patients, Moore and Van Slyke2 found that a critical level of the plasma protein concentration exists above which there is usually no tendency toward the formation of edema and below which such tendency is regularly present. This critical level is about 5.3 per cent of total

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