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August 10, 1946

PENICILLIN IN INFECTIONS INVOLVING THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM AND SKULL

Author Affiliations

San Francisco

From the Division of Surgery of the University of California Medical School.

JAMA. 1946;131(15):1183-1185. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870320001001
Abstract

During the past two years 37 patients with infections involving the central nervous system and skull have been treated with penicillin. Sixteen of these patients had meningitis; 10 had localized intracranial infections, including 5 of the meningitis patients and 5 without meningitis; and 25 had infections of the bones of the skull, of whom 9 also had central nervous system infections and 16 did not.

MENINGITIS  In the group of 16 patients with meningitis, 12 had pneumococcic meningitis, 2 had alpha hemolytic streptococcus meningitis, 1 had staphylococcic meningitis and 1 had a meningitis with a gram-negative rod believed to be Alkaligenes fecalis.

Pneumococcic Meningitis.—  All these patients were acutely ill with temperatures of 104 to 105.8 F. The origins of the infections were acute middle ear and mastoid infection in 6 cases, pneumonia in 2, head injury with

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