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Article
September 7, 1946

APLASTIC ANEMIA AND AGRANULOCYTOSIS FOLLOWING TRIDIONEA Fatal Case

Author Affiliations

Chicago
From the Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine, and St. Luke's Hospital.

JAMA. 1946;132(1):13-16. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870360015004
Abstract

Recently Tridione (3,5,5-Trimethyloxazolidine-2-4dione, Abbott) has been introduced as an effective anticonvulsant, of particular value in the control of petit mal and psychomotor seizures. Several closely similar compounds were studied in 1938 by Erlenmeyer for their narcotic effects, which were found to be slight.1 Tridione itself was synthesized by Spielman,2 and was subsequently reported to have anticonvulsant properties when given to mice, guinea pigs, cats and rabbits.3 During and since 1945 many physicians have used it for the treatment of convulsive disorders in the human being, and a few reports have appeared regarding its effects. In general, it has been found of value in the control of petit mal and even of psychomotor attacks, while its toxic manifestations have been very few and relatively unimportant. Richards and Perlstein4 reported "no side effects." Lennox5 mentioned skin rashes and sensitivity of the eyes to light—the latter chiefly in

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