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Article
September 14, 1946

The Biology of Schizophrenia

Author Affiliations
 

By R. G. Hoskins, Ph.D., M.D., Director of Research, Memorial Foundation for Neuro-Endocrine Research, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. The Thomas William Salmon Memorial Lectures of the New York Academy of Medicine. Cloth. Price, $2.75. Pp. 191. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1946.

JAMA. 1946;132(2):114. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870370060029

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Abstract

This approach to the study of schizophrenia from the biologic point of view is extremely well handled by the author, who as the director of research at the Memorial Foundation for Neuro-Endocrine Research, Harvard Medical School, is well equipped through training and experience to discuss the subject. As the author points out, schizophrenia primarily represents a distortion of the total personality, and its manifestations in different persons is as varied as the people themselves vary in their personal conduct. The book is divided roughly into three sections: (1) a discussion of the general background of the processes of life itself from the protoplasmic stage to that of man as he is today, (2) a comparison of schizophrenia with other biologic patterns and (3) a summing up of the principal functional deviations which are common to schizophrenia with an attempt to correlate the metabolic, endocrine and circulatory aspects. This book is

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