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Article
October 10, 1953

CARCINOMA OF THE CERVICAL ESOPHAGUS AND LARYNXTREATMENT OF AN ELDERLY PATIENT BY ESOPHAGOLARYNGECTOMY (WOOKEY OPERATION)

JAMA. 1953;153(6):552-553. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940230024006d
Abstract

It is well known that some malignant tumors, especially in elderly persons, grow slowly, and, if they are excised, the prospects for cure are excellent. This case is reported because it illustrates the difficulty in the early diagnosis of lesions that produce dysphagia and the possibilities of cure by operation in carcinoma of the cervical esophagus even after the symptoms have been present for many months and after the larynx has become involved.

REPORT OF A CASE

A 78-year-old white woman was admitted to the Henry Ford Hospital on June 21, 1952. She had noted difficulty in swallowing early in 1950, and roentgenography of the esophagus had been carried out in June of that year (fig. 1A); no organic lesion could be seen. The patient was reassured, and during the next year she was able to eat fairly well. Then there was a gradual recurrence of symptoms, and on May

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