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Article
November 5, 1932

ACUTE MYELITIS (MYELOMALACIA)SYNDROME OF OCCLUSION OF THE ANTERIOR SPINAL ARTERY AT THE FIFTH CERVICAL CORD SEGMENT

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

JAMA. 1932;99(19):1572-1575. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740710016004
Abstract

Two strikingly similar pictures of cervical myelitis have recently been observed. Although they lack anatomic verification, little doubt exists as to the exact nature and location of the pathologic process, viz., occlusion of the anterior spinal artery at the fifth cervical cord segment with softening in the anterior portion of the cord at and below this segment. Both of the cases occurred in persons of middle age with vascular hypotension but not affected with syphilis. The onset was matutinal; the development of the full-blown picture was rapid. Motor involvement consisted of spastic quadriplegia with local atrophies in the distribution of the lower motor neurons of the affected cord segments. Sensory loss was dissociated; the temperature and pain sensation was disturbed, whereas deep sensibility and the sensation of touch were retained. In both cases, moreover, inversion of the radial reflex (Babinski1) confirmed the upper level of the lesion (the fifth cervical

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