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Article
November 5, 1932

SEVERE POSTPARTUM EPISTAXIS IN A CASE OF NEPHRITIC TOXEMIA

Author Affiliations

Los Angeles

JAMA. 1932;99(19):1603. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27410710001011
Abstract

The relative infrequency of postpartum epistaxis in nephritic toxemia, together with the radical procedure necessary in this case to save the patient's life, seems to justify its report. According to Solomons and Wilson,1 a Dutch astrologer in 1660, in referring to the supposed influence of the planet Venus on the human body, stated that there was astrologic evidence of an intimate relationship between the genital organs and the nose. The relationship between the sexual organs and the organs of the mouth and neck have been noted medically since the days of Aristotle, but it was not until 1884 that J. N. Mackenzie2 called attention to the irritation of the sexual apparatus as an etiologic factor in the production of nasal disease. The engorgement of the cavernous tissue of the nose during pregnancy is now well recognized. Hubbard,3 in reporting a case of epistaxis during pregnancy which ended

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