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November 12, 1932

PULSATING EXOPHTHALMOS: TREATMENT BY PARTIAL LIGATION OF INTERNAL CAROTID

Author Affiliations

Atlanta, Ga.

From the Department of Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1932;99(20):1683-1684. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27410720001010
Abstract

Since the first description of pulsating exophthalmos by Benjamin Travers in 1809, treatment has been directed along the same general lines; namely, proximal arterial ligation. It was first believed that the condition was confined to the eye, but that opinion was discredited by Guthrie in 1823 when he performed the first autopsy and found it due to an aneurysm of the ophthalmic artery. Even from this date the pulsation was noted to disappear with compression of the common carotid artery, and ligations have been practiced since. At first only the common carotid artery was ligated; but since Murray's1 description in 1904 the internal carotid has been ligated as frequently as the common carotid. Locke2 states that the results obtained are the same. Kerr3 advocates ligating the common carotid.

The use of digital compression of the carotid by de Schweinitz and Holloway, as advocated by Locke,2 has

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