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Article
November 16, 1946

STREPTOMYCIN THERAPY IN INFECTION OF URINARY TRACTFailure Because of Development of Resistance

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Department of Bacteriology and the Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine. On duty with United States Public Health Service (Dr. Ottenberg) and at Hahnemann Medical College (Dr. Brown).

JAMA. 1946;132(11):634-635. doi:10.1001/jama.1946.02870460024007
Abstract

The development of resistance by bacteria to chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of infectious diseases is becoming of increasing importance. With the wide usage of the sulfonamides and penicillin at present and probably of streptomycin in the near future, the problem of the development of fastness by organisms in the body during the period of treatment is a matter of great concern to the clinician. The manner in which organisms frequently become resistant to sulfonamide compounds is well recognized.1 Development of fastness to penicillin has been observed2 in some organisms during therapy but occurs much less frequently than fastness to sulfonamide compounds. Failure of organisms to readily develop a fastness to penicillin is probably one of the main reasons for the great effectiveness of this agent. With the newer antibiotic, streptomycin, however, the ease and speed with which organisms become resistant to it in vivo may prove to

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