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December 5, 1953

ERYTHROMYCIN IN LOCAL TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS BACTERIAL INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

Galveston, Texas
From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Texas School of Medicine. The study was aided in part by a grant from the Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Mich.; Dr. Livingood is now Physician-in-Charge, Division of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit 2.

JAMA. 1953;153(14):1266-1270. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940310034008
Abstract

Erythromycin, discovered by McGuire and his associates1 in 1952, is a new antibiotic produced by a micro-organism (identified as a strain of Streptomyces erythreus that was isolated from a soil sample collected on the Island of Panay, Philippine Islands. This antibiotic is white, crystalline, soluble in water to the extent of about 2 mg. per milliliter, and highly soluble in some organic solvents, such as alcohol and acetone. It is a basic compound with an empiric formula that is thought to approximate C39H73NO13; there is no benzene ring structure in the formula. Stability data indicate that the dry crystalline compound is stable at room temperature for at least a year, but solutions of the antibiotic are comparatively unstable. The best stability is achieved with low temperature and neutral pH. At room temperature with a pH of 7, 86% activity remained after a storage period

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