[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
April 1, 1950

PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION IN THE PREVENTION OF CHRONIC INVALIDISM

Author Affiliations

Richmond, Va.

From the Baruch Center of Physical Medicine, Medical College of Virginia.

JAMA. 1950;142(13):967-969. doi:10.1001/jama.1950.02910310011003
Abstract

The most important causes of chronic invalidism are degenerative changes associated with aging and the destructive lesions of chronic disease. Certain acute illnesses, accidents and injuries also leave damaged tissues and functional abnormalities which lead to enduring physical disabilities. That the specific technics of rehabilitation and retraining can be applied to reduce such physical handicaps is now being demonstrated in treatment centers scattered throughout the country.1 I propose herein not to review these trends but rather to discuss some of the mechanisms which explain why dynamic activity appears to be the keynote to rehabilitation and how physical medicine furthers its objectives.

The clinical literature of the present decade has focused considerable attention on the evils of bed rest2 and the restorative effects of early ambulation.3 The work of Blodgett,4 recently editorialized on in The Journal of the American Medical Association,5 now suggests that early ambulation following

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×