[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 26, 1953

PROBLEM OF THE GASTRIC ULCER REVIEWEDSTUDY OF ONE THOUSAND CASES

Author Affiliations

Boston
From the Department of Gastroenterology of the Lahey Clinic.

JAMA. 1953;153(17):1505-1508. doi:10.1001/jama.1953.02940340007003
Abstract

The problem of gastric ulcer continues to be a subject of controversy because of the association of this disease with cancer of the stomach. Since surgeons and gastroenterologists are so often confronted with the grim and frustrating circumstances that surround the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer, it is natural that any lesion of the stomach should be considered potentially malignant. Such fear is indeed justified if it breeds a vigilance that may result in the early detection of cancer; however, it must not be forgotten that benign ulcers of the stomach with potentiality of complete healing do occur.

Ulcerating lesions of the stomach fall into one of two categories: (1) ulceration in an infiltrating lesion, grossly recognized as malignant, and (2) ulceration with an appearance of peptic ulcer. The disposition of the first group is, of course, to immediate surgery, with the hope that operation is possible and the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×