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Article
January 9, 1954

TREATMENT OF ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO SHOCK

Author Affiliations

Boston

From the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and the Medical Service and Medical Research Department of the Yamins Research Laboratory, Beth Israel Hospital.

JAMA. 1954;154(2):107-111. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02940360005002
Abstract

Acute myocardial infarction is the cardiac emergency that most frequently confronts the physician. The pathophysiological mechanism may be coronary thrombosis, acute coronary occlusion, or prolonged ischemia in the absence of coronary closure.1 Since the myocardial infarct is the pathological lesion responsible for the clinical syndrome, and since the presence, absence, or exact character of the arterial occlusion cannot be diagnosed clinically, it is more accurate to use the term "acute myocardial infarction" rather than alternative designations such as coronary thrombosis, coronary occlusion, or coronary insufficiency. Regardless of the causal mechanism, the general principles underlying the treatment of acute myocardial infarction are essentially the same. The aims of treatment are to provide optimum rest of the patient's heart in order to promote healing of the infarct and to prevent further damage by protecting the patient and his heart from undue strain until a firm scar has been established and adequate

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