[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.157.73. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 9, 1954

CRITICISM OF PHYSICIANS

Author Affiliations

The Memorial Hospital Easton, Md.

JAMA. 1954;154(2):167. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02940360065023

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

To the Editor:—  Oftener and oftener we read in nationally circulated magazines and journals stories of rascality in the medical profession. These articles usually follow the same pattern—sensational exposé of "unnecessary" surgery, "ghost" surgery and fee-splitting, poor surgery, poor medicine, fee gouging, or some variation of these. Some of these stories have been almost venomously critical of unidentified physicians practicing in unidentified hospitals; some have given the identity of physicians and hospitals in the few isolated instances in which unethical practices were partially supported, at least, by expert medical investigators. All of the articles I have read, however well founded the criticisms may have been in the few such cases publicized, have had the effect of being adversely critical of the medical profession and of hospitals generally. For reputable magazines to lend their pages to what amounts to calumny against 99% of the members of a high profession hardly seems

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×