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Article
December 10, 1932

PYELOSCOPIC AND UROGRAPHIC STUDY BEFORE AND AFTER RENAL SYMPATHECTOMY

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1932;99(24):2004-2008. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740760014004
Abstract

Renal sympathectomy on a human being was first done by Papin1 about 1921 for nephralgia and small painful hydronephrosis. Since that time many case reports have appeared in the literature throughout the world. The indications for this procedure are many, including reflex anuria,2 nephraglia,1 early tuberculosis of the kidney,2 prevention of reformation of renal calculi,2 certain types of nephritis,3 acute hypertension,2 renal sympathicotonia,3a painful hyperdynamic motility of the renal pelvis and painful nephroptosis.4

Most of these indications deal with relief of pain. The question arises as to whether the relief is due to interference with the pain-conducting nerve fibers or to a change in the mechanism of the motility of the renal pelvis. If motility changes occur, is satisfactory renal drainage interfered with? Do definite clinical entities in the form of painful abnormal motility syndromes exist which may form the basis

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