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Article
April 3, 1954

RELATION OF ABSENCE OF TONSILS TO BULBAR POLIOMYELITIS

JAMA. 1954;154(14):1180-1181. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02940480032011
Abstract

Data have been provided over a period of years to suggest that mere absence of tonsils and adenoids, regardless of the time of their removal, leads to increased susceptibility to bulbar poliomyelitis. In a study of 432 patients with acute anterior poliomyelitis, Lucchesi and LaBoccetta1 found that in 61% of patients whose tonsils were absent at the time the infection occurred the bulbospinal form of the disease developed while in 76% the bulbar type developed. A much higher incidence of bulbar involvement took place in these persons than in patients who still had tonsils and adenoids, the difference being apparent in all age groups. Seventy-eight per cent of the patients who died of poliomyelitis had neither tonsils nor adenoids when they became ill.

In 1952, Top2 investigated 1,947 patients who had been admitted to the Herman Kiefer Hospital in Detroit over a 10 year period because of poliomyelitis.

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