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Article
April 10, 1954

PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS ON THE EFFECT OF TRYPSIN ADMINISTERED INTRAVENOUSLY

Author Affiliations

Denver

Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1954;154(15):1260-1263. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02940490024006
Abstract

The recent investigations on the effect of the pancreatic enzyme trypsin, administered intravenously, may prove the opening wedge to a new line of approach toward the management of inflammatory processes. It would seem worth while, therefore, to review the background for these developments, to indicate some of the applications and results of treatment, and to emphasize the complications that have been observed clinically.

Trypsin is not a new drug. In the early 1900's, William Bätzner made use of this enzyme in treating soft tissue tubercular abscesses, bone and joint tuberculosis, and tuberculous lymphadenitis. He would inject the solution locally and at the same time administer it intravenously. In an article published in 1911 he reported cases of bone tuberculosis that healed without operative intervention and with regeneration of the bone.1 He also reviewed the products then available and the work done up to that time by other investigators. Most

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