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December 17, 1932

URINARY ANTISEPSISA COMPARISON OF METHENAMINE, CAPROKOL, PYRIDIUM AND ACRIFLAVINE AS TO CLINICAL EFFICIENCY

Author Affiliations

OMAHA

From the University of Nebraska College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1932;99(25):2097-2102. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740770027006
Abstract

We propose merely to present the results of one method only of attempting to evaluate certain drugs used for the purpose of internal urinary antisepsis. Incidentally, we hope to direct attention to the subject of commercial exploitation in the drug trade, using these results by way of illustration.

THE PROBLEM OF INTERNAL URINARY ANTISEPSIS  The experimental requirements of the ideal internal urinary antiseptic have been defined (Davis1) as that drug "which is chemically stable, nontoxic, and nonirritating to the lower urinary tract; which is antiseptic in high dilution (in urine, as well as in water), and which is eliminated unchanged in high percentage by the kidney." An assumption, however, is involved in expecting the drug that possesses these experimental requirements to be (necessarily) clinically efficient in eliminating existing infections in the urinary tract. As has likewise been pointed out (Davis2), there is a distinction between experimental fitness and

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