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Article
April 17, 1954

ROUTINE TONOMETRY AS PART OF THE PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

Author Affiliations

Portland, Ore.

From the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Oregon Medical School.

JAMA. 1954;154(16):1343-1345. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02940500023009
Abstract

From the viewpoint of most general practitioners, the diagnosis of ocular disease requires equipment and training that are out of proportion to their productivity. Consequently, the responsibility for both diagnosis and treatment of ocular diseases has been left to the eye specialist by common consent. Such an arrangement might be satisfactory if the more serious progressive ocular problems were promptly recognized and referred for care as soon as they became manifest. Such is not the case however, for one of us (L. C.) has found that an appreciable percentage of the blind and near-blind patients examined in the outpatient clinic of the University of Oregon Medical School had previously passed unrecognized through practitioners' offices, clinics, and hospitals while their disease was in an active phase.1 This was particularly true of chronic glaucoma, in which adequate therapy depends on early recognition. At least 20,000 persons (15% of the blind population)

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