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December 24, 1932

REPAIRS AND ADJUSTMENTS OF THE EYELIDS

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.

JAMA. 1932;99(26):2171-2176. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740780023006
Abstract

He who undertakes to restore function or to correct the appearance of a damaged eyelid must be prepared to consider not only the anatomy and contour of the lid itself but also the structures that give it support and those that are in continuity. A neighboring distortion can damage or hamper the movements of an intrinsically normal lid, or, if unrecognized, might compromise the operative result.

Function first, appearance second, are the motifs that actuate surgical restorations. Besides protecting the eye from harsh contacts, foreign particles and excess light, the lid nurtures by the caress of its lining, the nice application of the tarsal edge that at every blink sweeps the exposed ocular surfaces, and the slight sphincter action of the orbicularis muscle that pumps the cleansing tears toward the puncta. All these, as well as the maintenance of proper relation of these puncta to the globe, are dependent upon

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