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Article
June 19, 1954

PRIMARY TORSION OF THE OMENTUM IN CHILDREN

Author Affiliations

Miami, Fla.; Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Attending Surgeons, Variety Children's Hospital (Drs. Davis and Mangels).

JAMA. 1954;155(8):744-745. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.73690260008008d
Abstract

While primary torsion of the omentum is unusual in adults, it is exceedingly rare in children. When MacLean1 reviewed the literature in 1950, he found two instances of omental torsion in children and he reported three others from England. In one instance, however, MacLean pointed out that concomitant appendicitis was present and that therefore the case could be considered one of secondary omental torsion. The low incidence of primary torsion in children and the similarity to the clinical picture of acute appendicitis in children make the following case reports of interest.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  A 6-year-old white boy was admitted to the hospital for observation because of pain in the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. The child had noticed generalized abdominal pain two weeks before his admission. The pain apparently had subsided, and the patient was asymptomatic until just before admission when he awakened with cramp-like

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