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Article
July 10, 1954

HUMAN SICKNESS CAUSED BY BRUCELLA ABORTUS, STRAIN 19

Author Affiliations

Waterford, Wis.

JAMA. 1954;155(11):970-971. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.73690290003006a
Abstract

Brucella abortus, strain 19, is widely used for the inoculation of cattle against brucellosis. Without losing its antigenicity, the virulence of this strain of the organism has been greatly attenuated by extensive subculture and animal passage. The strain has, until recently, been considered relatively innocuous to humans. Recently Spink and Thompson1 noted the paucity of reports of human brucellosis caused by Br. abortus, strain 19, and, therefore, they reported two such cases resulting from acccidental inoculation with this organism. Both cases involved veterinarians. One case was the first in which the organism was isolated from the blood stream and its presence well documented bacteriologically. These authors warned that the antigen should be handled cautiously and only by qualified personnel.

This report is of a similar experience, also involving a veterinarian who was accidentally inoculated with Br. abortus, strain 19. While bacteriological proof of brucellosis is lacking, this case serves

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