[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 24, 1954

PLASTIC REPAIR OF THE MUCOUS MEMBRANE AFTER CLOSED FOSSA TONSILLECTOMY

Author Affiliations

Rochester, N. Y.

From the Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

JAMA. 1954;155(13):1154-1155. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.73690310004007c
Abstract

Since the first tonsil surgery was performed, it has been traditional to leave the fossa wide open after incision is completed. As might be expected of any large wound that is left open and allowed to granulate and heal from the edges, hemorrhage has, through the years, continued to be a serious problem that sometimes causes death. In an effort to improve the situation from the point of view of hemorrhage, the closed fossa tonsillectomy was introduced in May of 1952.1 Continued success with this procedure in over 1,000 consecutive hemorrhage-free cases2 and the improved postoperative course of the patients prompted us to look for a means of completing the closure of the wound, i. e., closure of the mucous membrane over the narrow raw surface left after the use of the closed fossa technique.

Observation of patients after tonsillectomy over a period of years shows that in

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×