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September 13, 1947

POISONING DUE TO TINCTURE OF RHUS TOXICODENDRON

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Jewish Hospital.

JAMA. 1947;135(2):91-93. doi:10.1001/jama.1947.62890020003007b
Abstract

In 1866 Dr. J. W. Moorman of Hardinsburg, Ky.,1 reported the cases of 2 children who each ate about 1 pint (550 cc.) of the fruit of Rhus toxicodendron, or poison ivy. In a few hours they became drowsy and stuporous, and in a short time vomiting commenced. The vomitus at first consisted of the partially digested fruit, and this was followed by a thick tenacious fluid the color of red wine. Generalized convulsions then appeared accompanied by delirium. The respiratory rate was hurried, the pulse weak and rapid and the pupils dilated. Emesis was induced, and a solution of sodium carbonate was freely administered. Both children recovered. In 1867 there was reported2 the case of a boy who drank tea made from the root of R. toxicodendron. He became delirious, and there developed nervous twitchings, watery eyes, an intense burning sensation in his stomach and an intolerable

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