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September 13, 1947

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE TISSUE REACTIONS CAUSED BY ANTIGENS

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

Professor of Histology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; Chief, Division of Pathology, Philadelphia General Hospital.

JAMA. 1947;135(2):94-97. doi:10.1001/jama.1947.62890020006008
Abstract

With the introduction of polyvalent vaccines into medicine, the question has been raised whether or not it is safe or profitable to prescribe such vaccines. As antigens are not inert, large quantities of bacterial cells may be expected to have damaging effects. Where is the borderline of safety? Also of concern is the question whether the simultaneous introduction of several antigens produces the same degree of protection per antigen as the isolated administration of these antigens at different times. In brief, what is the optimal procedure of administering antigens? As this is an important question, I was glad to fill the request of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry to undertake an inquiry into certain experimental evidence involved in this problem, with special consideration of the various mesenchymal reactions that may be caused by antigens.

The introduction of an antigen into a tissue causes, as is generally known, an inflammatory

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