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October 7, 1950

SURGICAL RELIEF OF EPILEPSY ASSOCIATED WITH CAROTID SINUS SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

Beverly Hills, Calif.

From the Departments of Surgery and Medicine, Cedars of Lebanon Hospital, Los Angeles.

JAMA. 1950;144(6):463-464. doi:10.1001/jama.1950.62920060002008a
Abstract

Epilepsy is sometimes referred to as the epileptic syndrome, acknowledging that the characteristic convulsive phenomena may have a variety of causes. Perhaps the earliest recognized cause of symptomatic epilepsy was cardiac asystole. In 1827 Adams1 described a number of patients in whom convulsive symptoms coincided with absence of the pulse at the wrist. He concluded correctly that the epileptiform attacks in these persons were of cardiac origin. In more recent years a number of conditions not referable to the central nervous system have been found to be responsible for convulsive seizures; these include, among others, spontaneous hypoglycemia, paroxysmal tachycardia, lead poisoning, nonspecific fevers and drug reactions.2 Differential diagnosis of these entities is essential because specific therapy may stop the epileptiform attacks. In the case reported herein, a seldom encountered etiologic factor was active: a hypersensitive carotid sinus.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  J. B., a man aged 51, was

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