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Article
September 18, 1954

ALLERGIC SENSITIZATION OF THE SKIN AND ORAL MUCOSA TO ACRYLIC DENTURE MATERIALS

Author Affiliations

Woodside, N. Y.

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the New York University Post Graduate Medical School and the Skin and Cancer Unit of the University Hospital.

JAMA. 1954;156(3):238-242. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02950030030010
Abstract

Statistics from several large dental laboratories in New York City and vicinity show that over 90% of the dental plates made today are processed from acrylic resins. In addition to heat-cured resins used in making entire dental plates, a great deal of acrylic denture relining and repair material is used that is self-cured without the application of heat.

The acrylic denture base materials1 with which I am concerned are marketed in two forms: a powder polymer and a liquid monomer that are designed to be mixed to a dough by the dental mechanic or dentist, and a gel, in which the polymer and monomer are already mixed by the manufacturer. The liquid monomer is methyl methacrylate, and the powder is polymethyl methacrylate. When the mixed liquid and powder or gel is heated further polymerization takes place, and the mixture hardens to form the familiar pink plate material.

In addition

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