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November 22, 1947

STREPTOMYCIN-RESISTANT DIPHTHERIA

Author Affiliations

Medical Corps, United States Army; Medical Corps, Army of the United States

From the Medical and Laboratory Services of the Madigan General Hospital, Tacoma, Wash.; Senior Resident in Internal Medicine, Lieut. Col. Walker, and Chief of the Cardiovascular Section, Captain Massey. Colonel Maxwell G. Keeler, Medical Corps, United States Army, commanding.

JAMA. 1947;135(12):771-773. doi:10.1001/jama.1947.62890120003010
Abstract

control of the disease during an outbreak but also in building up and maintaining a relatively highly immune dog population through the annual vaccination of dogs with rabies vaccine should be pointed out.

In view of the essential existing responsibility of the Bureau of Animal Industry of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the U. S. Public Health Service and the U. S. Fish and Wild Life Service, this Conference recommended that the function of coordinating a campaign for the control of rabies on a national scale be vested jointly in these three agencies. A plan for accomplishing this on a cooperative basis can undoubtedly be worked out through consultation of representatives of the agencies involved.

Reports in the literature indicate in vitro sensitivity of Corynebacterium diphtheriae to both penicillin1 and streptomycin.2 Skinner3 reported favorable results when relatively small doses of penicillin (25,000 to 100,000 units daily)

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