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Article
November 6, 1954

SIGNIFICANCE OF HYPERGLYCEMIA WITHOUT GLYCOSURIAA TEN TO TWENTY-EIGHT YEAR STUDY

Author Affiliations

Cleveland; Calif.; Cleveland

From the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and the Frank E. Bunts Educational Institute.

JAMA. 1954;156(10):925-929. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02950100001001
Abstract

One of the major aims in the present-day treatment of diabetes is the prevention of complications. There are two opposed schools of thought. The first holds that major complications bear no relationship to the severity of the disease or to treatment.1 Maintenance of optimal weight, absence of symptoms, and absence of urinary ketones are thought to indicate adequacy of therapy,2 and abandonment of the principles of careful calculation of dietary intake is recommended.3 The second concept points to the benefits of as rigid control as possible in lowering the proportion of complications appearing.4 Such a contention is supported by the opinions of Frederick Allen and most of those whom he questioned.5 It is also supported by the evidence of Keiding, Root, and Marble6 and Wilson, Root, and Marble.7 We acknowledge freely that factors may be discovered that are more intimately connected with the

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