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November 18, 1950

IMPORTANCE OF FOODS IN PATIENTS AS DETERMINED BY SKIN TESTING AND INTENTIONAL FEEDING

Author Affiliations

Brooklyn

From the Department of Medicine, Division of Applied Immunology, Beth-El Hospital.

JAMA. 1950;144(12):990-993. doi:10.1001/jama.1950.02920120014005
Abstract

The value of food tests in the management of allergic patients is being questioned by many leading allergists. It is not a question merely of the method of testing, the interpretation of results or the quality of the testing material. It involves the basic principle of the diagnosis of the specific etiological agent. If skin tests with food extracts are not reliable in the diagnosis of the etiological factor, then the procedure is questionable. Indeed, Randolph1 has stated that he no longer tests his patients with foods. Waldbott, Shea and Harrington,2 in a group of patients who were undernourished as the result of prolonged food elimination according to skin tests, successfully treated 88 per cent of these with a diet that completely ignored results of these tests. Tuft3 suggested that it is difficult to interpret the results of food tests because positive reactions may indicate past, present

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