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November 18, 1950

ROENTGEN AND STEROID HORMONE THERAPY IN MAMMARY CANCER METASTATIC TO BONE

Author Affiliations

San Francisco

From the San Francisco Hospital Department of Radiology, Stanford University Service.

JAMA. 1950;144(12):997-1004. doi:10.1001/jama.1950.62920120003008
Abstract

Bone metastases occur in a high percentage of cases of advanced mammary cancer and constitute perhaps the leading source of distress and disability from that disease. A majority of these metastases, but by no means all, produce pain; many are associated with pathological fracture. Should bone metastases be treated primarily with roentgen rays, with steroid hormones or with a combination of both? The occasional remarkable results obtained with one or another of these methods tend to bias the attending physician and confuse the serious therapeutist. In an attempt to answer the first two parts of this question, my associates and I have reviewed the results in a consecutive series of cases of bone metastasis from breast cancers treated with roentgen irradiation alone and with steroid hormone therapy alone. In addition, we have been privileged to take part in the studies of the Subcommittee on Steroids and Cancer (of the Committee

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