[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 13, 1954

IMPORTANCE OF THE PERINEURAL SPACES IN NERVE BLOCKING

Author Affiliations

Seattle

From the Department of Anesthesiology, Mason Clinic (Drs. Moore and Bridenbaugh), the Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine (Dr. Hain), and the Division of Neurosurgery, University of Washington School of Medicine (Dr. Ward).

JAMA. 1954;156(11):1050-1053. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02950110012005
Abstract

Physicians who inject nerve blocking agents, either to produce local anesthesia or to alleviate pain, are aware of the possible complications associated with these procedures. However, few seem to be cognizant of the potential significance of the relationship of the perineural spaces to the subarachnoid space and the spinal cord as the determining factor in the development of some of the more serious complications. This relationship was bluntly called to our attention by recent experiences after the use of Efocaine (a solution of 1% procaine, 0.25% procaine hydrochloride, and 5% butyl-p-aminobenzoate in a solvent composed of 2% polyethylene glycol 300, 78% propylene glycol, and water). It was originally advertised as a safe, long-acting (two to four weeks' duration), local anesthetic mixture unassociated with encapsulation, abscesses, foreign body reactions, tissue sloughs, or other such adverse effects encountered after the use of oil solvents.1 Early published reports seemed to

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×