[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.82.105. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
December 4, 1954

MEDICOLEGAL ASPECTS OF STERILIZATION, ARTIFICIAL INSEMINATION, AND ABORTION

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Staff Associate, Law Department, American Medical Association.

JAMA. 1954;156(14):1309-1311. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.02950140009003
Abstract

Medicolegally speaking, operations to produce sterility may be contemplated or performed for one of three reasons: eugenic, therapeutic, or nontherapeutic. What civil or criminal liability is incurred by the physician who, for one of these three reasons, performs such an operation? Twenty-nine states1 have enacted legislation that provides for the sterilization of the socially inadequate. This legislation is a study in itself2 and cannot briefly be summarized. Generally it may be said, however, that it designates the classes of persons to which it applies, persons who for practical purposes may be included in one of five groups: feeble-minded, insane, epileptic, habitual criminals, or moral degenerates. This legislation, in the main, applies to those portions of the enumerated classes of defective persons that are confined in specified institutions. Consent and due process of law are aspects of this legislation that should be considered locally according to the law of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×