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Article
January 8, 1955

THE PSYCHIATRIC EFFECTS OF FLYING (LOW) TO CONVENTIONS

Author Affiliations

203 Fannin State Bank Bldg. Houston 25, Texas.

JAMA. 1955;157(2):169-170. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950190069024

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Abstract

To the Editor:—  Having no cotton planted or wheat standing in the field, my only concern for the weather arises when I head for the airport. On my way to be one of the thousands of relaxed, carefree passengers who depart on time every month, I notice my increased interest in wind and rain. In fact, many other "limousine" riders become equally interested in the weather—so much so that the limousine (which bears a striking resemblance to a city bus, except it's easier to fall in the aisle and it's always dark) has iron bars to prevent the passengers' sticking their heads out the windows for a better view of the scattered clouds. After the bus goes over the flat plains for hours, making the usual number of detours off the highspeed highway, the airport comes into view, well placed in a short valley with a mountain at the end

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