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Article
January 29, 1955

BRYANT'S TRACTIONA PROVOCATIVE CAUSE OF CIRCULATORY COMPLICATIONS

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1955;157(5):415-418. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950220009003
Abstract

Bryant's traction for treatment of fractures of the femur in children has been blamed for few complications; these were skin irritations, decubitus ulcers, and peroneal palsy. In 1950, Philip M. Winslow1 reported on three children who had been treated with Bryant's traction and in whom circulatory complications had developed. One child, 7 years of age, had necrosis of the skin and "paralysis below the knee." In two children, 8 years of age, there was bilateral involvement; one had residual equinovarus deformities, and the other had gangrene of the lower legs, with a fatal termination on the eighth day. Volkmann's ischemia in the lower extremity was first reported in the literature in 1935 by Jones and Cotton.2 Their two subjects were men more than 45 years of age who had received crush injuries at the popliteal area. The first reference to ischemic contracture in the lower extremity in children

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