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Article
March 27, 1948

USE OF ANTIHISTAMINE DRUGS IN THE TREATMENT FOR TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

Author Affiliations

Washington, D. C.

JAMA. 1948;136(13):870-872. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.72890300001006
Abstract

Chronic paroxysmal trigeminal neuralgia has been known since early civilization. According to Grinker,1 it was first adequately described in 17/2 by Fothergill. This condition may affect all three divisions of the fifth cranial nerve; it may affect one branch alone, or it may occur in any combination of branches. The first symptom is paroxysmal pain, with gradually decreasing intermissions between attacks. The pain is severe and is described as sharp and shooting, "red hot" or like electric shocks. There may be sympathetic stimulation during the attacks, such as flushing of the affected side of the face, salivation, lacrimation and dilatation of the pupil. The pain usually continues for several hours, and it is characterized by the fact that at any time it may be exacerbated by the stimulation of a "trigger point." Some writers have noted that the paroxysms occur more frequently in spring and fall.

Many methods of

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