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Article
February 12, 1955

EFFECTS OF TOBACCO AND WHISKEY ON THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

Staten Island, N. Y.; Brooklyn, N. Y; Staten Island, N. Y.

From the Cardiovascular Research Unit, Department of Medicine, United States Public Health Service Hospital, Staten Island, N. Y.

JAMA. 1955;157(7):563-568. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950240001001
Abstract

Although there is no convincing proof that tobacco directly causes or intensifies the average case of angina pectoris, it is common practice for physicians to advise against its use in all patients suffering from this affliction. There is still considerable difference of opinion as to whether or not the use of tobacco is harmful to patients with coronary artery disease. Thus, Levy and associates1 maintain that cigarette smoking causes only slight changes in the circulation and does not significantly increase the work of the heart. Because of the enjoyment afforded and the emotional satisfaction obtained, they believe that patients with inactive forms of heart disease should be permitted to smoke in moderation. Boas2 also asserts that tobacco is not nearly as harmful to patients with coronary artery disease as is popularly supposed. It is true that there are no valid experimental data on the effect of nicotine on

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