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Article
March 5, 1955

STANDARDIZATION AND EFFICACY OF BCG VACCINATION AGAINST TUBERCULOSISTWENTY YEAR STUDY: A CRITICAL EVALUATION

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Institute for Tuberculosis Research of the University of Illinois, the Chicago Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium, the Research Foundation, and Cook County Hospital.

JAMA. 1955;157(10):801-807. doi:10.1001/jama.1955.02950270019006
Abstract

In evaluating BCG vaccination, one must first define its potentialities. BCG vaccine, properly administered, will increase the resistance of both animal and man to virulent tubercle bacilli. This resistance is not absolute. The degree of resistance that it is possible to develop against tuberculosis may not be as great as for some other disease. Yet it should be borne in mind that there is no disease against which absolute immunity can be achieved. This fact was sharply brought into focus with the report of an epidemic of smallpox among our armed forces in Korea.1 This experience showed that adequate exposure could break down resistance even after multiple vaccinations against smallpox. The potency of the vaccine and the methods of administration were also taken into consideration. In evaluating BCG vaccination, all of these factors must be considered: (1) the vaccine itself, (2) the method of administration, and (3) the degree

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